Author Topic: sonerai 2 landing with a talk through  (Read 5069 times)

N788T

  • registered
  • Join Date: Dec 2010
  • Posts: 157
  • My Gallery
  • Engine: Great Plains 2180
  • Sonerai Model: Sonerai 2 midwing (dual controls)
sonerai 2 landing with a talk through
« on: Feb 29, 2012 »
! I was asked to make this video.
1) This is just one technique, used for high wind/ and cross wind.
2) This is just a demo, this is in no way to be a substitute for quality flight instruction.
3) I have used this technique up to 25kt direct cross wind.
4) This technique is NOT suited for short fields, as I do not use any mechanical breaking action. Brakes are reservered for steering only in this technique.
5) All experimental aircraft handle differently, use caution in high winds at all times.
6) I am a professional pilot with thousands of hours flight time.
7) The winds in this video are from 090 at about 10kt and I am landing on runway 35.
sonerai landing with narration.MP4
Every day you must embrace your inner Snoopy!

AirSkip2012

  • registered
  • Join Date: Apr 2012
  • Posts: 66
  • My Gallery
  • Engine: Great Plains 2180
  • Sonerai Model: IIL
Re: sonerai 2 landing with a talk through
« Reply #1 on: Oct 12, 2015 »
Casey made this video for me.  RIP, Casey.  Blue Skies, Bud.

Skip

Thaddeus

  • Subscriber
  • registered
  • *
  • Join Date: Jul 2014
  • Posts: 147
  • My Gallery
  • Engine: Corvair 2700
  • Sonerai Model: 2LT Minus-1 Gonnabe
Re: sonerai 2 landing with a talk through
« Reply #2 on: Oct 12, 2015 »
Tragedy seemed connected to that plane.  Cliff Rosa bought it from Casey and crashed it in Tennessee a couple of months later in July 2013.  The crash killed Cliff, ironically, just after take off.  Rosa was ex-Army aviation with time in Iraq, so he may have Known Casey who had similar service.
"It seems wisest to assume the worst from the beginning...and let anything better come as a surprise.” 
― Jules Verne, The Mysterious Island

AirSkip2012

  • registered
  • Join Date: Apr 2012
  • Posts: 66
  • My Gallery
  • Engine: Great Plains 2180
  • Sonerai Model: IIL
Re: sonerai 2 landing with a talk through
« Reply #3 on: Oct 13, 2015 »
Tragedy was not associated with that plane.  The guy that bought it was a relatively low time   pilot. Casey made sure he could handle the plane before sale.  The engine died twice on the way to the strip before he flew.  He took off down wind and uphill at half the runway.  NTSB said there was no charger found in hanger.  Secondary back-up, uncharged or inadequately charged would cause the rough running engine.  Sometimes when you just think you have to fly, you shouldn't.  Casey had many hours of problem free flight in this airplane. 

Thaddeus

  • Subscriber
  • registered
  • *
  • Join Date: Jul 2014
  • Posts: 147
  • My Gallery
  • Engine: Corvair 2700
  • Sonerai Model: 2LT Minus-1 Gonnabe
Re: sonerai 2 landing with a talk through
« Reply #4 on: Oct 13, 2015 »
My interest is in knowing every available nuance of a crash, and the posting is helpful for us to understand what went wrong with this Sonerai and/or its operation.  I was not dissing the airplane and certainly not Casey.  Only observing that two owners associated with it are now deceased in flight-related events.  The Sonerai obviously performed well for Casey when he was flying it, better than its replacement.  Downwind TO with a rough or iffy engine is just about anyone's invitation to a disaster. I think that the community owes it to the community to post everything known about an event because experience varies 100% for every aspect of building, operation, and flying.  In a world of perfect knowledge, we'd have a flow chart for each airplane and pilot that would show how things happen.  We could all learn from that. It takes a lot of work to try and construct that with piecemeal information. The video is Casey's lasting contribution to the Sonerai community. May he rest in peace.
"It seems wisest to assume the worst from the beginning...and let anything better come as a surprise.” 
― Jules Verne, The Mysterious Island

Pttim

  • Administrator
  • registered
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2008
  • Posts: 1529
  • My Gallery
  • I thought this would only take a year!
  • Engine: Great Plains 2180
  • Sonerai Model: SIIL
Re: sonerai 2 landing with a talk through
« Reply #5 on: Oct 13, 2015 »
Here is the NTSB report for N788T hence no more speculation needs to take place on this forum.   I also read nothing in here about a lack of battery charger in his hanger or lack of substantial battery charge in the aircraft itself.

We DO NOT speculate on this site when it comes to matters such as these.  We wait for the facts and the facts are below.




NTSB Identification: ERA13LA320
On July 16, 2013, about 0805 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Thompson Sonerai II, N788T, was destroyed during collision with terrain and a post-crash fire following an uncontrolled descent after takeoff from Abernathy Field Airport (GZS), Pulaski, Tennessee. The certificated private pilot/owner was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Witnesses reported to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector that they watched as the airplane came to a stop on Runway 34, with the propeller stopped, after having taxied out from the parking area. They watched the pilot deplane, walk to the front of the airplane, restart the engine, then climb back into the cockpit. According to the witnesses, the airplane began its takeoff roll from that point, where approximately 2,500 feet of the 5,310-foot-long runway remained. The airplane departed downwind, and used the entire up-sloping runway that remained before it rotated "steeply."

The airplane travelled 2,900 feet beyond the departure end of the runway before it descended "vertically," impacted a state highway in a nose-down attitude, and subsequently caught fire.

A witness who was travelling on the state highway noticed the airplane because it was lower than typical departing traffic. Just prior to the airplane crossing over the roadway, it "pulled straight up…like a crop duster…about 70 –75-degree angle" before it rolled to the left and descended straight down to ground contact.

Witnesses stated that they heard the engine "sputtering" and running roughly during taxi and takeoff.

Examination of photographs revealed the engine compartment, cockpit, left wing, and empennage were completely consumed by fire. The right wing was largely intact, and the leading edge was crushed uniformly across the leading edge, consistent with a near-vertical, nose-down impact. Control continuity was established from the cockpit to all flight control surfaces. The right-side engine cylinder heads were separated from the engine by impact, and the internal components were exposed. An examination of the engine was not completed due to extensive impact and fire damage.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued February 10, 2012. A review of the pilot's logbook revealed that he had logged 120 total hours of flight experience, of which 9 hours were in the accident airplane. He had logged 3 hours in the 90 days prior to the accident, and 28 hours in the year previous to the accident.

The airplane was manufactured in 1982, and was purchased by the pilot/owner on March 31, 2013. The maintenance logbooks were not recovered, but according to the FAA inspector, an annual inspection was completed in May 2012. The inspector added that the engine was not equipped with an electric starter.

In an interview with an FAA inspector, the previous owner explained the flight characteristics of the accident airplane. He detailed the inherent instability of the airplane's design, the speeds necessary to maintain stable takeoffs and landing approaches, and the airplane's stall characteristics. The previous owner stated that the airplane required "lots of airspeed" to be stable. He stated 100 mph was his preferred airspeed in the airport traffic pattern, as well as in a climb to facilitate engine cooling. He stated that the airplane had no dihedral in the wing, which lessened its lateral stability, and added that the wing would dip very quickly in a stall. He indicated that a 1,000-foot altitude loss would be normal for a recovery from the resultant spin. The airplane also exhibited adverse yaw tendencies, which required "lots of rudder attention." The previous owner stated he had entered an inadvertent spin on several occasions while practicing aerodynamic stalls.

At 1621, the weather reported at GZS included clear skies and wind from 140 degrees at 3 knots. The temperature was 26 degrees C, the dew point was 23 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 30.31 inches of mercury. The computed density altitude was 2,040 feet.


Aviation Accident & Synopsis Query Page




Resources
Press Releases
Speeches/Testimony
Databases
Accident Dockets
Training Center
Safety Recommendations
Accident Animations
Strategic Plan, Performance & Accountability Reports & More
Media
Pttim
____________________________________________________

Member:  Tail Dragging Stick Monkey Association

 

Recent Topics

Nice cold weather flying today! by kennyw
Dec 14, 2017

Air/Oil Seperator by Smokyray
Dec 14, 2017

Hydraulic brake choices by wbpace
Dec 13, 2017

Sonerai 2 fuel tank on Ebay by wbpace
Dec 13, 2017

Racegunz's Sonerai 1 by Raceair
Dec 12, 2017

Sonerai 2 Midwing For Sell Lower Michigan-by Airspace by ggrant
Dec 11, 2017

Sonerai Sighting in Maryland by Pttim
Dec 11, 2017

My new CHT guage by jeff naul
Dec 08, 2017

Curious Problem by kennyw
Dec 07, 2017

Chucker's Sonerai II (minus) by Chucker
Dec 07, 2017

flying with 2 by juergen
Dec 06, 2017

Wing limitation by Soneraifred
Dec 05, 2017

New Sonerai I Pic by Smokyray
Dec 04, 2017

9 ribs A-wing print needed by Manu
Dec 04, 2017

Powered by EzPortal